Geometric associates the mathematician with the designer, and demonstrates that both art and science are needed in order to create our world. (Photo by Katie Butler)

Art Meets Science in “STEAMED” Exhibit

“No Vacancies”, on display until March 2 in the Thacher Gallery of Gleeson Library, is a series of photographs representing numerous San Francisco neighborhoods.     One would say it’s a plain piece, but the colorful stills ingeniously disguise their political nature. In reference to an Edward Ruscha artifact, artist Sergio de la Torre exposes neighborhoods where immigration and customs enforcement raids took place. The “Google map” point of view engages the spectator as one recognizes their home, associating the political character of the piece to one’s personal life.

The purpose of STEAMED is to create an environment which promotes art as a determinant in building our world, and therefore an equal of science. Designed by USF’s art faculty, the exhibition explores the necessary, yet rarely acknowledged connection between art and the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The gallery includes works made not just by craftspersons but also by problem solvers.

Scott Murray’s “Geometric” explores the Sierpinski triangle—a fractal, or, a mathematical set displaying similar patterns, obtained by repeatedly removing smaller triangles from the original shape. Projected on a screen, the triangle responds to our movements, bringing geometry to life, while also aestheticizing it.

Our interaction with “Geometric” becomes quite playful and you may surprisingly find yourself dancing in front of the screen for a rather long time.

Whether it is a rock climbing wall, or look-a-like Lego bricks made out of mushrooms, STEAMED urges us to look at a world where art and science are one discipline.

Photo by Katie Butler

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One thought on “Art Meets Science in “STEAMED” Exhibit”

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